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Unit 1- Citizenship

Unit 1- Digital Citizenship

Lesson 1 (Download)

Rationale / Context: This Digital Citizenship lesson (1/3) is meant to begin the process of building a digital community in the classroom that reflects the NETS-S standards surrounding Digital Citizenship. Over the course of the three lessons, the various elements of Digital Citizenship will be covered and students will engage in activities that will enrich and ensure understanding. In this lesson, a prezi presentation will be used to guide the discussion and help engage students.

Standards: NETS-S

5. Digital Citizenship: Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior. Students:

a. advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and technology

b. exhibit a positive attitude toward using technology that supports collaboration, learning, and productivity

c. demonstrate personal responsibility for lifelong learning

d. exhibit leadership for digital citizenship

Objectives:

  • Students gain understanding around what the Internet is and how it works. A dialogue around the usefulness of the Internet as well as potential risks involved is begun.
  • Students understand what digital citizenship means, and the importance of being a good digital citizen. Students begin to explore issues around online safety and being kind online.
  • Students begin to explore the rights and responsibilities of being a digital citizen.

Time: 60 min

Materials:

  • Soft ball (optional for cyberspace demo/explanation)

Procedure:

  1. Introductions/ Student names : Introduce myself, brief explanation of the program. Go around and have each student tell me their name, one thing they are good at and one thing they want to get better at. (could be tech related, but not necessarily) (20 min)
  2. Digital Citizenship discussion accompanied by Prezi
    1. You are a citizen of the United states, of your community and school, and now you are a cyber citizen – what does that mean?
    2. You are a member of a global online community…
  3. SO what is the internet?
    1. What is the Internet? What is cyberspace? Is it real?
      1. Use ball to demonstrate cyber communication
    2. What can the Internet be used for? How do I use the Internet now?
    3. What kinds of things would I like to use the Internet for in the future?
  4. Back to Digital Citizenship –
    1. Cybercitizenship is global
      1. Rights
      2. responsibilities
  5. Look at NETS-S Digital Citizenship Standards (5 min)
    1. Discuss prior knowledge/ ideas about what they mean
  6. Poster Contest (explain)

Assessment:

  • Informal assessment of student prior knowledge based on initial brainstorm/ discussion

Accommodations: Multiple learning styles targeted: Visual, kinesthetic, auditory, use of technology

Closure/ Connections:

The Digital Citizenship poster contest is introduced and explained. This contest gives students a creative way to express their learning, and an opportunity to win a flip camera. Additionally, because the winning poster from each school will be posted online, students will have the chance to see 12 posters created by students their age across the state.

Lesson 2 (Download)

Rationale / Context: This Digital Citizenship lesson (2/3) continues where the fist lesson left off. Two five minute Faux Paws cartoons (focused on cyber-bullying and online safety) will be used as a hook for this lesson. Students will discuss the importance of being safe, kind, respectful and responsible online and what to do should they ever encounter a cyber-bully. Students will be broken into groups and given hypothetical scenarios around internet safety and digital citizenship. Each group will determine what the correct course of action would be given their scenario and they will create and act out a 2 minute skit to demonstrate what a good digital citizen would do in that situation. Each group will be given a flip camera to record their skit and the as a class, we will watch each group’s video and discuss how they chose to handle the situation.

Standards: NETS-S

5. Digital Citizenship: Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior. Students:

a. advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and technology

b. exhibit a positive attitude toward using technology that supports collaboration, learning, and productivity

c. demonstrate personal responsibility for lifelong learning

d. exhibit leadership for digital citizenship

6 . Creativity and Innovation: Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct knowledge, and develop innovative products and processes using technology. Students:

a. apply existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products, or processes.

b. create original works as a means of personal or group expression.

c. use models and simulations to explore complex systems and issues.

d. identify trends and forecast possibilities.

Objectives:

  • Students understand the importance of being kind online, and correct action should they ever encounter a cyber-bully.
  • Students understand the importance of not giving out personal information online
  • Students write and perform a skit illustrating good digital citizenship.

Time: 60- 90 min

Materials:

  • Access to the two faux paws cartoons
  • Projector
  • Student worksheets outlining hypothetical scenarios (Download)
  • Flip cameras (one per group)

Procedure

  1. Faux Paws Cartoons – (first one focuses on private information and the importance of not agreeing to meet someone in person with whom you have connected online and the second one focuses on cyberbullying)
    1. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gPse7dcXwrU
    2. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=baC-f_P7vjY&feature=channel
  2. Class discussion around the cartoons
  3. Break students into groups of 3-4, give each group a scenario worksheet. (Download worksheets)
  4. Each group will read the scenario and determine the proper course of action.
  5. They will write and act out a skit to illustrate what they have collectively decided would be the best thing to do.
  6. Each group will video tape a final version using a flip camera
  7. As a class we will watch each group’s video and discuss the way they chose to handle the situation. Other students (outside the group presenting) might offer other suggestions or ideas as well.

Assessment

  • Formative assessment based on discussion around cartoons.
  • Teachers will be able to assess student understanding based on the videos each group creates addressing digital citizenship and online safety, as well as the discussion around each video.

Accommodations: Multiple learning styles targeted: Visual, kinesthetic, auditory

Group work & Individual work, use of technology

Closure/ Connections:

Students use what they learned from the previous digital citizenship lesson as well as the cartoons and related discussions to inform their decisions in the writing the skit and creating the video. The videos could potentially be posted on a school or classroom website. Using the flip camera to create a video will begin to build skills for future video projects.

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